See attachment! Book uploaded. Description “The front cover show a photo of a man clamping two steel wire rope together.” READING THE AMERICAN PAST

See attachment! Book uploaded.

Description
“The front cover show a photo of a man clamping two steel wire rope together.”

READING THE AMERICAN PAST
EIGHTH EDITION

Selected Historical Documents
Volume 2: From 1865

M������ P. J������
Johns Hopkins University

For Bedford/St. Martin’s
Vice President, Editorial, Macmillan Learning Humanities: Edwin Hill
Senior Program Director for History: Michael Rosenberg
Senior Executive Program Manager for History: William J. Lombardo
History Marketing Manager: Melissa Rodriguez
Director of Content Development, Humanities: Jane Knetzger
Developmental Editor: Mollie Chandler
Senior Content Project Manager: Kendra LeFleur
Assistant Content Project Manager: Natalie Jones
Senior Workflow Project Supervisor: Susan Wein
Production Supervisor: Lawrence Guerra
Executive Media Project Manager: Michelle Camisa
Media Editor: Mary P. Starowicz
Editorial Services: Lumina Datamatics, Inc.
Composition: Lumina Datamatics, Inc.
Text Permissions Manager: Kalina Ingham
Text Permissions Editor: Michael McCarty
Photo Permissions Editor: Cecilia Varas
Photo Researcher: Naomi Kornhauser
Director of Design, Content Management: Diana Blume
Cover Design: William Boardman
Cover Image: Steve Dunwell/Getty Images

Copyright © 2020, 2012, 2009, 2005 by Bedford/St. Martin’s.

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a
retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic,
mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, except as may be
permitted by law or expressly permitted in writing by the Publisher.

1 2 3 4 5 6 24 23 22 21 20 19

For information, write: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 75 Arlington Street, Boston,
MA 02116

ISBN 978-1-319-26003-3 (mobi)

Acknowledgments
Text acknowledgments and copyrights appear at the back of the book on
page 298, which constitutes an extension of the copyright page. Art
acknowledgments and copyrights appear on the same page as the art
selections they cover.

Preface for Instructors
Reading the American Past is a collection of compelling documents that
represent political, social, and cultural experiences critical to students’
understanding of the scope and diversity of United States history. Created
by people who shaped American history in ways both large and small, these
primary sources reveal the views of the authors, the historical context in
which they were written, and the major developments and controversies of
their era. The documents give depth, breadth, and variety to textbook
discussions of important developments in our nation’s past. Organized
chapter by chapter to parallel The American Promise: A History of the
United S

Essay 4: Causes of the Cold War

Due March 26

20% of final grade

Historians have written extensively on the deterioration of relations between the United States and the Soviet Union.  Many have focused on the immediate post-WWII years (1945-1955) in search of the causes of the Cold War.  Some historians blame the Soviets, other historians blame the Americans, while a more nuanced approach stresses the inevitability of the conflict, but also blames both.  This essay expects students to draw on the resources posted on the canvas Cold War module to answer the following question:

Who should historians blame for the Cold War and why?

Students should write an argumentative essay that discusses in full at least 3 pieces of evidence that helps support their conclusion/answer.  That evidence should be analyzed in the context of the question—who should historians blame for the Cold War and why?  The pieces of evidence are actual events, people, incidents–real, specific historical information that validates your perspective.  

 

Essay Structure:

By now everyone should understand the importance of keeping your essay tightly organized.  Writing history essays is an “art,” but they also require “discipline.”

Everyone’s essay should be structured the same way.

–The introduction paragraph (about 5-7 sentences) must contain a thesis statement.  The thesis statement, your argument, is the answer to the question—who should historians blame for the Cold War and why?  It’s always a good idea for students, after the thesis statement in the introduction, to include tidbits of information that will help the reader understand the scope of the argument.  In this case, a couple of sentences explaining the “why” part of the question.  Put differently, the thesis statement needs to be more than simply “The US is to blame for the Cold War.”  The thesis statement, and the sentences that follow, need to be as explanatory as possible given the limited space.

–The body paragraphs should all start with a topic sentence—the first sentence of every paragraph should explain what the point of the paragraph is and how that point relates to the thesis.  Your reader should be able to understand the different parts of the argument simply by reading each topic sentence.  Each body paragraph needs to focus on developing, discussing, and analyzing at least one piece of evidence—an incident, a policy, a conflict, a decision, a person—something that can be pointed to as proof of your argument.  The pieces of evidence selected should be as specific as possible.  You must have evidence.  Without evidence there is no argument.  And if there is not an argument, the objectives of the assignment are left incomplete.  There should be 3 body paragraphs.  Each body paragraph will discuss one piece of historical information that helps prove your argument.  




See attachment! Book uploaded.











Description
“The front cover show a photo of a man clamping two steel wire rope together.”





READING THE AMERICAN PAST
EIGHTH EDITION

Selected Historical Documents
Volume 2: From 1865

M������ P. J������
Johns Hopkins University



For Bedford/St. Martin’s
Vice President, Editorial, Macmillan Learning Humanities: Edwin Hill
Senior Program Director for History: Michael Rosenberg
Senior Executive Program Manager for History: William J. Lombardo
History Marketing Manager: Melissa Rodriguez
Director of Content Development, Humanities: Jane Knetzger
Developmental Editor: Mollie Chandler
Senior Content Project Manager: Kendra LeFleur
Assistant Content Project Manager: Natalie Jones
Senior Workflow Project Supervisor: Susan Wein
Production Supervisor: Lawrence Guerra
Executive Media Project Manager: Michelle Camisa
Media Editor: Mary P. Starowicz
Editorial Services: Lumina Datamatics, Inc.
Composition: Lumina Datamatics, Inc.
Text Permissions Manager: Kalina Ingham
Text Permissions Editor: Michael McCarty
Photo Permissions Editor: Cecilia Varas
Photo Researcher: Naomi Kornhauser
Director of Design, Content Management: Diana Blume
Cover Design: William Boardman
Cover Image: Steve Dunwell/Getty Images

Copyright © 2020, 2012, 2009, 2005 by Bedford/St. Martin’s.



All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a
retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic,
mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, except as may be
permitted by law or expressly permitted in writing by the Publisher.

1   2   3   4   5   6          24   23   22   21   20   19

For information, write: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 75 Arlington Street, Boston,
MA 02116

ISBN 978-1-319-26003-3 (mobi)

Acknowledgments
Text acknowledgments and copyrights appear at the back of the book on
page 298, which constitutes an extension of the copyright page. Art
acknowledgments and copyrights appear on the same page as the art
selections they cover.





Preface for Instructors
Reading the American Past is a collection of compelling documents that
represent political, social, and cultural experiences critical to students’
understanding of the scope and diversity of United States history. Created
by people who shaped American history in ways both large and small, these
primary sources reveal the views of the authors, the historical context in
which they were written, and the major developments and controversies of
their era. The documents give depth, breadth, and variety to textbook
discussions of important developments in our nation’s past. Organized
chapter by chapter to parallel The American Promise: A History of the
United S


Essay 4: Causes of the Cold War


Due March 26


20% of final grade

Historians have written extensively on the deterioration of relations between the United States and the Soviet Union.  Many have focused on the immediate post-WWII years (1945-1955) in search of the causes of the Cold War.  Some historians blame the Soviets, other historians blame the Americans, while a more nuanced approach stresses the inevitability of the conflict, but also blames both.  This essay expects students to draw on the resources posted on the canvas Cold War module to answer the following question:
Who should historians blame for the Cold War and why?
Students should write an argumentative essay that discusses in full at least 3 pieces of evidence that helps support their conclusion/answer.  That evidence should be analyzed in the context of the question—who should historians blame for the Cold War and why?  The pieces of evidence are actual events, people, incidents–real, specific historical information that validates your perspective.  
 

Essay Structure:

By now everyone should understand the importance of keeping your essay tightly organized.  Writing history essays is an “art,” but they also require “discipline.”
Everyone’s essay should be structured the same way.
–The introduction paragraph (about 5-7 sentences) must contain a thesis statement.  The thesis statement, your argument, is the answer to the question—who should historians blame for the Cold War and why?  It’s always a good idea for students, after the thesis statement in the introduction, to include tidbits of information that will help the reader understand the scope of the argument.  In this case, a couple of sentences explaining the “why” part of the question.  Put differently, the thesis statement needs to be more than simply “The US is to blame for the Cold War.”  The thesis statement, and the sentences that follow, need to be as explanatory as possible given the limited space.
–The body paragraphs should all start with a topic sentence—the first sentence of every paragraph should explain what the point of the paragraph is and how that point relates to the thesis.  Your reader should be able to understand the different parts of the argument simply by reading each topic sentence.  Each body paragraph needs to focus on developing, discussing, and analyzing at least one piece of evidence—an incident, a policy, a conflict, a decision, a person—something that can be pointed to as proof of your argument.  The pieces of evidence selected should be as specific as possible.  You must have evidence.  Without evidence there is no argument.  And if there is not an argument, the objectives of the assignment are left incomplete.  There should be 3 body paragraphs.  Each body paragraph will discuss one piece of historical information that helps prove your argument.  

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